Barbican Estate


Barbican Concrete Repairs

Structural Renovations secured a further phase of concrete repair work at the Barbican Estate in June 2018. The works include the 3No. tower blocks, 11No. terrace blocks and 9No. underground car park areas.

Similar to previous phases that Structural Renovations have completed the works involve repairing defective bush-hammered and fair-faced concrete surfaces, using specialist hand-placed mortars, approved by our client, the Corporation of London and English Heritage.

In additional we are contracted to complete resin-injection to seal ongoing leaks from podium areas, together with the installation anodic protection, to control corrosion within the buried steel reinforcement.

The works are being accessed by various means, including abseiling for the towers and terraces, scaffold for isolated structures and lightweight aluminium mobile tower within the car parks.

The entire estate is Grade II listed due to it being one of London’s principal examples of Brutalist Architecture but meaning any necessary repairs are to be carried our sensitively, so as not to detract from the original design ethos of the architects, Chamberlain, Powell & Bon.

The project is due for completion in May 2019.

Beaux Arts Building


Beaux Arts Building

Structural Renovations will shortly be completing a 6 month contract to repair and protect the external elevations of this very large and impressive building, constructed between 1909 and 1911 in a style of architecture known as Beaux Arts.

Originally built to house the GPO Money Order Office, it was sold in the 1990’s by the Royal Mail for redevelopment and converted in to 190 flats in 1994. The building is now recognised as one of the most important in the area.

Our works have included surveying all concrete and render surfaces to establish the condition, followed by carrying out sympathetic repairs using polymer modified mortars. All areas have then received a primer followed by 2 applications of a pigmented anti-carbonation coating to protect the structure from the atmosphere.

In addition to the repair and coating works a significant amount of the original Crittal windows have been replaced to an approved design that the local authority has been closely involved with, to ensure that this significant example of an architectural style more likely to be found in France (Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris), or further afield in the USA (Grand Central Station, NYC). The windows that haven’t been replaced have been redecorated along with all other existing metalwork, guttering and rainwater pipes.

Furthermore the roof level ‘pods’ have been waterproofed using Sika’s Sikalastic 625 and a number of terraces waterproofed with Sika’s Sikalastic Rapid 721.

Carnival Pool


Carnival Pool - Concrete Repairs

In early May Structural Renovations were employed to carry out emergency repairs to the reinforced concrete at Carnival Pool in Wokingham.

The leisure complex was constructed in the early 1990’s and following a detailed survey of the undercroft areas of both the main and learner pools it was established that extensive repairs would be required to the supporting beams, soffits, drainage channels and external walls of the pools.

The complex is planned for redevelopment in 2020 but in order to keep it operational until then a repair scheme had to be implemented that would provide the required protection in an aggressive environment.

Working closely with the local authorities consulting engineer it was agreed that defective concrete would be removed and any exposed reinforcement treated prior to reinstatement with a polymer modified repair mortar. In certain locations where the warm, moist atmosphere, combined with chemical attack was most likely to accelerate the deterioration of the concrete a migrating corrosion inhibitor (MCI) was applied.

Additional works instructed included waterproofing the drainage channels, both internally and externally, using a thixotropic modified polymer coating, complete with an embedded elastomeric composite tape.

This 6 week project was completed on time and due to careful programming the public parts of the complex were required to be closed for only 2 of those weeks.

New Square


New Square

Work has recently been completed to a metal access staircase on a large business park in west London. Structural Renovations secured the project with a repeat business client, after providing assistance on the production of a suitable specification for the issues being encountered.

The staircase was suffering from extensive corrosion and failed coatings, which had led to the structure looking unsightly and potentially unsafe where the non-slip wearing surface of the treads had worn away.

We took possession of the site in early April and closed the staircase off to the public and business park staff.

Extensive protection was put in place prior to the entire structure being open blasted using a recycled glass media, to remove all existing coatings and corrosion back to a sound substrate. The prepared metalwork was then recoated using a 3 coat paint system usually applied in a marine environment, such as oil rigs, gas platforms and dockyards. The primer and intermediate coats were 2-component, epoxy based and the top coat was polyurethane based and also a 2-component product. The treads of the staircase incorporated a quartz sand to provide good slip resistance and the nosings of each tread were further treated with a 2-component, traction enhancing coating in a contrasting colour.

The project was completed a week ahead of programme, despite suffering from poor weather conditions at various points.

Hoover Building


Hoover Building Structural Renovations

Structural Renovations Limited has recently completed a 12 month concrete repair and specialist coating project at the iconic Hoover Building in Perivale, West London.

The building was constructed as a factory for the Hoover Company in 1933 to the design of Wallis, Gilbert & Partners, who were inspired by the Mayan and Aztec fashion displayed at the 1925 Paris Exhibition and remained operational until its closure in the 1982.

During the Second World War the factory was used to manufacture parts for various aircraft and the building was camouflaged with netting to help avoid being attacked.

Being of significant architectural importance the building was Grade II* listed in October 1980 and in 1989 Tesco purchased the site and set about converting the rear into a large supermarket, including sympathetic recreations of various original building motifs around its entrance and car park.

In 2016 Structural Renovations were employed to carry out a condition survey of the concrete to the original structure and from the results of the survey we developed a specification for its repair and protection, based on the use Sika products.

We were duly instructed in March 2017 to commence the repair and restoration works and following an initial clean we were able to identify all spalling/defective concrete. Where required the concrete was repaired using a polymer modified repair system, combined with the installation of a vapour phase inhibitor, to control any ongoing corrosion in the embedded reinforcement.

Previously painted areas received a multi-coat elastomeric system and unpainted elements of the building had a clear anti-carbonation coating applied.

Finally, all existing sealants at the junction between window frames and painted concrete were raked out, prepared by priming and reinstated with a one part low modulus sealant.

During our external works the internal areas of the original building were converted into 66 luxury apartments by IDM Properties.

We are proud to have been involved in prolonging the life of this prestigious example of Art Deco architecture and it demonstrates the capabilities of our Company.

Cressy House


Cressy House - Structural Renovations Concrete Repairs

Structural Renovations commenced work in October this year at this purpose built residential development, comprising 3 linked blocks, in southwest London.

Our brief was to survey, prepare and repair the exposed faces of the reinforced concrete slabs, which form the floors and roof.

Previous repairs and coatings had deteriorated, together with additional defects that had developed since the last maintenance scheme and the survey identified extensive damage.

All defective concrete was removed back to sound material and the edges square-cut to prevent feather-edging. Any exposed reinforcement was cleaned of corrosion before being treated with 2 coats of corrosion preventative primer. The prepared defects were reinstated using a polymer rich, cementitious repair mortar, back to the original surface profile.

Following completion of repairs the previously decorated concrete was pressure-washed to remove loose and failed coatings, to form a stable substrate, upon which a coat of water based, epoxy modified surface primer was applied. The primed surfaces were then treated with 2 coats of a pigmented, anti-carbonation coating to afford protection to both repaired and existing concrete but also to provide a uniform aesthetically pleasing finish.

The works were accessed from a fixed scaffold and completed within a restricted programme period, to the satisfaction of our client.