Sindlesham Court


Sindlesham Court - Structural Renovations

Structural Renovations Limited have recently undertaken a specialist masonry stabilisation project to a Grade II listed property in Berkshire, for a repeat business client.

Sindlesham Court was built in the Mid-17th Century for a prominent family in the area. It remained a large residential property until it was requisitioned in WWII to house female employees of the Miles Aircraft Company, based in Woodley. It is currently used as a Masonic Lodge and events venue.

Following a detailed survey it was established that part of the parapet wall was severely out of plumb (>110mm over a 1.0m height) and required stabilisation, together with areas of cracked masonry/brickwork below.

The defective length of parapet was carefully demolished and rebuilt before the installation of a Helifix Scheme.

As an Approved Installer for Helifix the newly built section of parapet was diamond drilled vertically down by 1.5m at 1.0m centres. Helifix SockFix anchors were then installed and secured in position using Helifix SockFix Grout, injected through a proprietary pressure vessel.

The cracked areas of brickwork below the grouted anchors in the parapet required Helifix HeliBeam to be installed, whereby Helifix HeliBar is embedded in Helifix HeliBond Grout before repointing to match surrounding brickwork.

Once installed both items described above ensure the parapet is tied to the main façade, to prevent future failure.

A 10 year Helifix Warranty was provided following completion.

Isleden House


Structural Renovations Isleden House

Structural Renovations Limited are currently working to repair and waterproof canopies at a sheltered housing complex known as Isleden House in Islington.

The estate was built in 1948 and opened by Queen Mary the following year. In 1953 the estate was handed over to the City of London who have instructed these works.

Following an initial condition survey concrete repairs have been completed using proprietary repair products, followed by the application of a pigmented anti-carbonation coating, which will extend the life of both repaired and unrepaired concrete.

The top surface of the canopies have been prepared and subsequently treated using a glass fibre reinforced polyurethane waterproof membrane to further protect the concrete.

The above works form part of a larger scheme that we have been asked to assist the City of London, which will involve us returning to the estate in 2021.

Huttons Hotel


Huttons Hotel - Structural Renovations Concrete Repairs

Structural Renovations have recently completed the external refurbishment of Huttons Hotel on Belgrave Road in London, SE1.

Huttons Hotel is converted from Victorian town houses and is situated approximately 1 mile from Buckingham Palace.

The building was thoroughly cleaned and loose coatings were removed. Following this a detailed visual survey and hammer test was undertaken to establish the extent of defective render and concrete.

Traditional render repairs were then carried out and the decorative details such as cornices and window surrounds were reformed using Flexcrete Monolite.

A decorative filler was applied to the facades to provide a level surface which was then over coated with Flexcrete Monodex Ultra.

To further enhance the life expectancy of the building the high level cornice was waterproofed with Sikalastic 625 and the junction between the window frames & reveals were resealed using Sika Hyflex 250 facade.

Southwark Estates


Southwark Estates - Structural Renovations

Structural Renovations have been awarded the contract by The City of London Corporation to verify the condition of the concrete on 10 residential blocks of flats in the Southwark, Southeast London.

The ages of the various blocks range between 65 and 90 years and are therefore some of the oldest flats in the area.

Although all the blocks appear to be predominantly constructed from brick, they do in fact contain significant quantities of reinforced concrete, in the form of public and private balcony supporting slabs, window surrounds, roof overhangs and lintels.

Our brief is to establish whether cast-in chlorides, combined with carbonation attack over time, has affected the condition of the buried reinforcement leading to cracking or spalling concrete which has the potential to compromise structural integrity.

The works will be carried out over an 8 week period, using specialist technicians working from mobile elevated works platforms, roped access techniques (abseil) and mobile towers.

Following completion of the site activities, a structural engineer’s assessment will determine the extent of necessary concrete repair and corrosion control. We will then develop and suitable specification, based upon one of the recognised concrete repair manufacturers repair systems.

This survey project will be completed whilst the blocks are live and therefore it is a requirement for us to ensure these works are completed in an efficient and timely manner, causing minimal disruption to residents.

The Observer Building, Hastings


Observer Building Concrete Repairs

Structural Renovations were awarded the contract to complete extensive structural repairs and apply protective coatings to all reinforced concrete within the landmark structure, known as The Observer Building, in Hastings town centre.

The building was originally constructed for the publishers and printers, F. J. Parsons, in 1924 and was designed by the Hastings architect, Henry Ward.

The building was subsequently used by The Observer Newspaper as both a printworks and its administrative centre, until vacating in 1985. The building has remained empty and neglected in the years between, which has allowed significant deterioration to be caused to the entire building fabric and in particular the reinforced concrete structure.

A number of surveys have been conducted over the years, when various parties showed an interest in taking on the building and each survey shows the increasing damage caused, in the main, by water ingress.

The building was finally purchased by White Rock Neighbourhood Ventures in late 2018, who, together with the assistance of various funders, intend to bring this impressive building back to life and utilise the enormous space available.

Our works have involved surveying all concrete surfaces to identify the full extent of defective concrete, before its removal back to a sound substrate. All exposed reinforcement is carefully prepared prior to be in treated with a proprietary primer. The prepared areas are reinstated using a cementitious, polymer modified repair mortar.

Due to the sheer size of the structure internally (in excess of 5,000m²), it was decided that the protective anti-carbonation coatings would be applied by airless spray equipment, which was purchased specifically for this project and has enabled the process to be sped up considerably.

During the works approximately 15 tonnes of repair mortar will be used and over 2,000 litres of anti-carbonation coatings.

It is testament to the original design and construction of this building, which was left to decay for so long that its repair was viable, and demolition was not necessary.

The external elevations of the building are hoped to be completed as part of a separate phase, which will be carried out in the near future.

Preece House


Preece House - Concrete Repairs

Structural Renovations have secured a 12 week project to remove brick slips from a 5 storey purpose built office block in Hove, known as Preece House.

The structure was built in 1980 when the fixing of brick slips (thin sections of brick) was still a relatively popular design feature. This gave the impression of an entirely brick built building, when in fact the slips were adhered, using mortar over the floor plate edges to conceal them, a little like tiling.

Over time the mortar used to affix the slips can fail, either through poor preparation at time of construction, or freeze/thaw activity, if moisture has penetrated behind them. This can lead to failure and the slips falling from the building, causing a significant health and safety risk.

Following a diagnostic survey earlier in the year it was identified that a significant amount of brick slips had failed or were beginning to fail. At this time the building was made safe by removing all loose slips, to reduce the risk to people or property.

A number of remedial actions were considered and in October the decision was taken to remove all brick slips from the building, thus removing the health and safety risk altogether.

The majority of the works is being carried out from scaffolding, which due to the shape of the building is cantilevered in places. Low level areas are being accessed from lightweight aluminium mobile towers.

Following the brick slip removal process, the exposed reinforced concrete substrate is surveyed, to identify if repairs are required. These are being carried out using Flexcrete Monomix, as part of their proprietary concrete repair system.

Once repaired we are contracted to apply Monolevel FC (fairing mortar), followed by the application of Flexcrete Monodex Ultra (pigmented anti-carbonation coating).

Associated works items, such as replacing perished sealants and localised repointing have now also been instructed and it is anticipated that the works will complete in mid-February 2019.